Full Denture

A full denture, also called a complete denture, replaces all of the natural teeth and provides support for cheeks and lips. By replacing missing teeth, dentures not only support sagging facial muscles, but also improve a person’s ability to speak and eat. As the name implies, a full denture can replace either an upper or lower arch or both arches.Full dentures are divided into two categories according to when they are made and inserted into the mouth.

Conventional dentures are made and inserted after the remaining teeth are removed and the tissues have healed. Immediate dentures are inserted immediately after the removal of the remaining teeth. An advantage of immediate dentures is that the wearer does not have to be without teeth during the healing period. However, immediate dentures may require rebasing or relining to fit properly after gums shrink from the healing period.

For patients with a history of breaking full dentures a metal palate or plate can be inserted into the denture for extra strength. Full dentures can also be retained by implants for better stability and function.

New dentures may feel awkward or uncomfortable for the first few weeks or even months. Eating and speaking with dentures might take a little practice. A bulky or loose feeling is not uncommon, while the muscles of your cheeks and tongue learn to hold your dentures in place. Excessive saliva flow, a feeling that the tongue does not have adequate room, and minor irritation or soreness are also not unusual